by Marion Nestle
May 14 2013

Attention policy wonks! It’s farm bill time again.

The Senate and House released their versions of the farm bill last week.  By size (1102 v. 576 pages) and extent of budget cuts ($23 billion v. $40 billion), these are  incompatible. I’m guessing that getting them passed and reconciled will require major compromises—hard to imagine for this dysfunctional Congress.

The Congressional Budget Office, according to the Hagstrom Report, estimates that the Senate bill will cost $955 billion from 2014 to 2023, and the House bill will cost $940 billion—but roughly $100 billion a year for the next 10 years.   Much is at stake.

The Senate Ag Committee is discussing its bill today (click here for details).  The House Ag Committee does this on Wednesday (click here).

To get up to speed, here are the relevant documents on the Senate side:

And here are the parallel documents on the House side:

As a reminder of what the farm bill is all about, see my previous posts on the subject from November 14 and November 26 2012.

The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), ever optimistic, has produced a report, The Healthy Farm: A Vision for U.S. Agriculture, identifying ways that the farm bill could—if there were any political will—support an agricultural system focused on producing abundant, affordable, and healthy food and on protecting the environment (also see its interactive healthy farm and take action sites).

During the coming days, I’ll take a stab at interpreting key pieces of the proposed bills.  Stay tuned.

2:00 p.m. addition: Jerry Hagstrom says the Senate Agriculture Committee has approved the farm bill by a vote of 15 to 5. Senators Roberts, McConnell, Johanns, Thune and Gillibrand voted no.  OK.  Now let’s see what the House does tomorrow.

Addition #2: Follow the amendments on FarmBillPrimer.org: Senate and House.

 

Comments

Hello to every one, because I am truly eager of reading
this webpage’s post to be updated regularly. It carries good material.

The links in the article got a bit munged.

Senate page

http://ht.ly/l1v2G

House page

http://ht.ly/l1v6h

Steve King is attempting to attach his atrocious Commerce Clause amendment, which nullifies any state law regarding agricultural products. So any humane livestock law, food safety law, even child labor law enacted via initiative or state legislature is null and avoid.

I certainly hope that people pay attention to this. Better yet, that you contact your House rep and Senators and tell them heck no, this is an awful amendment.

[...] tend to subsidize unhealthy food. Learn more about the farm bills in the House and Senate here: http://www.foodpolitics.com/2013/05/attention-policy-wonks-its-farm-bill-time-again/. This is a great time to call or write politicians and ask for a more sensible farm [...]

  • Ellen Fried
  • May 20, 2013
  • 9:54 am

An attempt to insert legalizing Hemp production into the Farm Bill. How fun is that?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/20/mitch-mcconnell-rand-paul-hemp_n_3294613.html

[...] This week, the House and Senate released their respective drafts of the Farm Bill. The Bill was scheduled to be passed in September, but the two Agriculture Committees couldn’t reach an agreement. The new drafts are not quite compatible—the Senate version is 1,102 pages with $23 billion in budget cuts and the House version is 576 pages with $40 billion in budget cuts. The Senate Agricultural Committee approved their version of the bill in a 15 to 5 vote; the House Agricultural Committee will hold the same vote on their bill on Wednesday. For more details on the bills and their proceedings, check out Food Politics. [...]

[...] This week, the House and Senate released their respective drafts of the Farm Bill. The Bill was scheduled to be passed in September, but the two Agriculture Committees couldn’t reach an agreement. The new drafts are not quite compatible—the Senate version is 1,102 pages with $23 billion in budget cuts and the House version is 576 pages with $40 billion in budget cuts. The Senate Agricultural Committee approved their version of the bill in a 15 to 5 vote; the House Agricultural Committee will hold the same vote on their bill on Wednesday. For more details on the bills and their proceedings, check out Food Politics. [...]

[...] This week, the House and Senate released their respective drafts of the Farm Bill. The Bill was scheduled to be passed in September, but the two Agriculture Committees couldn’t reach an agreement. The new drafts are not quite compatible—the Senate version is 1,102 pages with $ 23 billion in budget cuts and the House version is 576 pages with $ 40 billion in budget cuts. The Senate Agricultural Committee approved their version of the bill in a 15 to 5 vote; the House Agricultural Committee will hold the same vote on their bill on Wednesday. For more details on the bills and their proceedings, check out Food Politics. [...]

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